ACNC Registered
Country Freecall 1800 011 041 Telephone 08 8379 5711

Physical activity

Research has found that regular exercise is one of the most effective treatments for arthritis. Just as importantly, physical activity will improve your overall health. It can improve the fitness of your heart and lungs, increase bone strength, reduce body weight and reduce the risk of conditions such as diabetes. It also improves your sleep, energy levels and mental well-being.

To learn more about how physical activity can help your arthritis download the information sheet which provides general information including guidelines as to what types and how much exercise to do and general safety tips. It does NOT provide individual exercises or specific advice for each type of arthritis.

Exercise and Fibromyalgia

Regular exercise is one of the most important things you can do to manage fibromyalgia, even though it may be one of the last things you feel like doing. Research shows that people with fibromyalgia who exercise have:

  • less pain and fewer tender points
  • higher levels of fitness
  • greater ability to do daily tasks
  • reduced stress and depression

Exercise can also help you maintain a healthy body weight, strengthen your bones and improve the health of your heart and blood vessels. 

To learn more about how exercise can help when living with fibromyalgia download the information sheet which provides general information on what types of exercise are useful for fibromyalgia and how to get started. It does NOT provide individual exercises of programs.

Exercise and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 

Exercise is an important part of managing RA. People with RA who exercise have:

  • higher levels of fitness
  • better muscle strength and size
  • greater ability to do daily tasks
  • improved meed and emotional well-being

Exercise can also help you maintain a healthy body weight and improve the health of your heart and blood vessels. Some types of exercise may also help improve the strength of your bones and reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis (thinning of the bones). 

To learn more about how exericse can help you when living with RA download the information sheet which provides general information on what types of exercise are useful for RA and what to do during a 'flare' of your arthritis. It does NOT provide individual exercises of programs.

Water exercise and arthritis

Water exercise involves exercising in a pool, usually a heated, warm water pool, and may also be called 'hydrotherapy'. It is one of the most comfortable and effective ways that a person with arthritis can exercise because the joints and muscles can be exercised while suported in the water. Water exercise can be beneficial for people with any form of arthritis. It is particularly helpful for people:

  • with arthritis in several joints as all joints can be exercised at once
  • with conditions affecting feet, knees, hips and the back
  • preparing for or oversoming from joint replacement surgery
  • who find it difficult or painful to exercise on land. 

To learn more about how water exercise can help you download the information sheet which provides general information about different options for exercising in water and how to get started. It does NOT provide individual exercises or specific advice for each type of arthritis.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi is an ancient, Chinese martial art form that is practiced around the world as a type of gentle exercise. It involves smooth, flowing movements to help improve the flow of life and energy, or Qi (pronounced 'chee'), through your body. This is said to help create a sense of relaxation and improve or maintain health.

There are many different styles of tai chi and there can be great differences between each type. However, most are considered suitable for people with arthritis, including the 'Tai Chi for Arthritis program'. If you are a health professional and would like to learn how to deliver a 'Tai Chi for Arthritis' class in the community click here.

To learn more about Tai Chi download the information sheet which includes information on the benefits of tai chi and how to get started. It does NOT provide individual exercises of specific advice for each type of arthritis.